The Last Tiger





Author/member/thylacine fan.. Tony Black was kind enough to answer a few questions about his book "The Last Tiger" which is getting rave reviews on Amazon UK..see end of post.

Q-I was looking at your impressive list of crime novellas, short stories and books etc, what is the final count?

Tony Black-I think I'm up to 14 novels now, but I haven't counted up all the smaller stuff. The latest one is called Bay of Martyrs and is set in SW Victoria. I co-authored this with an Aussie writer called Matt Neal and it just came out here in the UK a week ago.

Q-What led you to writing as a career?

Tony-A complete lack of any other skills, to be brutally honest. I think I realised fairly early on that I wasn't going to get called up by Liverpool to pull on the red jersey, so writing jumped up the scale of my ambitions.

Q-How did you get interested initially into writing a book about thylacines?
Tony-I used to work on a paper in SW Victoria called The Standard and when I was there I wrote several stories about strange animal sightings in the district that the locals thought were the thylacine. I started to dig into the subject and was immediately hooked. It's a tragic story, something that should never have happened, and it struck a chord with me, on a very deep level, that is still resonating today.

Q-What research did that entail?

Tony-Initially, I went to the library in Warrnambool where I was staying and started to work my way through a shelf of books. In time I ended up talking to a lot of researchers and corresponded a little with Col Bailey, who I regard as one of the leading experts on the subject anywhere in the world. I was extremely flattered that Col rated The Last Tiger so highly because if anyone is qualified to pick apart my research it's him.

Q-Have you been to Tasmania or are you planning to go one day?

Tony-Yes, I've been to Tasmania and I've met up with Col, which was a great honour after all he's done for the subject of the thylacine. I'm planning another trip before the end of the year, once I get all my ducks in a row,

Q-Reviews of The Last Tiger on Amazon.UK are amazing, you must be proud of this sort of reader feedback.

Tony-Yes, of all my books I'd say The Last Tiger is the one that I held closest to my heart. The only other one that comes anywhere near is His Father's Son - also set in Australia - because it's dedicated to my son. The Last Tiger did get some great reviews and was runner-up in Not the Booker Prize (it won the popular vote by a mile, but that's another story!) so I can't complain about the critical response at all.

Q-Have any readers ever contacted you with thylacine claims?

Tony-Yes. Quite a few over the years. When I was working for The Standard, after my first story on SW thylacine sightings, I was inundated for a little while. I remember one old bloke coming in to the paper to tell me he saw a thylacine when it was brought to town by a travelling circus in the 1930s. He was still moved by that creature, spoke about how sad it looked in the cage the circus kept it in.

Q-Your writing skills are impressive enough to make some of your reviewers cry?
Tony-Hopefully for the right reasons! The agent I had when I wrote The Last Tiger was over in America, a really lovely woman, and she still tells me how moved she was by the book. She'll warn people who post on Facebook that they've just bought The Last Tiger to make sure they have a box of tissues to hand. I'd like to claim it's down to my writing but I think the story we all know of the demise of the thylacine is the real tear-jerker.

Q-Any more books on the tiger in the pipeline?
Tony-No, I'm afraid not. I'm not done with the thylacine, but it's a subject I think I've exhausted in The Last Tiger. The final chapter does, however, leave the door open for an addition to the story, a last hurrah for the thylacine if you like, I think we'd all like to see that chapter added to the story, one day.
Thanks for yout time Tony !
https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/cka/Last-Tiger-Tony-Black/1908885556

Tasmanian Tiger Tails

Thats not a typo.
I really meant Tails.
Here is the thing.
You find a photo like this below


The hunt for the australian tasmanian tiger


And you would look at the tail and go "okay, thylacines have striped tails".
And that would appear be a logical statement...
But then you notice that not all thylacine speciments have striped tails...actually the majority do not.
So what gives...?
Simple..
They dont..what photos we have of the animals alive..and short 8mm film clips...that appear to show a striped tail..are actually just showing the vertabrae shadow under the skin.
But back to the photo.
The stripes are painted on...thanks to the work of Cameron Campbell and Dr Sleighholme we know that the animal above is "the specimen is listed in the ITSD as the thylacine in Walter Rothschild's collection in Tring (Hertfordshire in the UK .The stripes on this specimen have been painted on, and are not due to natural pigment."
And then Cameron kindly provided this next photo.

The hunt for the australian tasmanian tiger



There are one or two other taxidermy specimens where this has been done.  The other specimen that comes to mind is the taxidermy in the National Museum of Ireland, in which the stripes continue along the full length of the tail (photo attached).  You will never find this anomaly on any of the specimen skins, or for that matter, in a living thylacine.

The worlds greatest data base on the thylacine is this site







Mike Archer Cloning the tasmanian tiger

We have got our answers back from Professor Mike Archer.
Its quite a read but is very informative and well worth the time. We are very lucky to have had this shared with us.
Is the cloning project being resurrected now that the entire thylacine genome has been sequenced?What is the likelihood that thylacines can be successfully cloned now?
Mike: See the attached document I’ve sent. The entire nuclear genome hasn’t yet been sequenced but people are working on it. The mitochondrial genome has been sequenced and published by a team from the US. I’m convinced we will have them back in the future but have no idea when this may happen—but probably sooner than later!
Can you put a time frame on it? If one day successful can a viable population be sustained, considering the limited gene pool?
Mike: If one can be produced, hundreds can. Almost all specimens in museums and private collections will have recoverable DNA hence males, females and genetic variation can be recovered. But do we even need genetic variation? All cheetahs are virtually genetically identical and they’re doing fine.
If the cloning project were ever to go ahead, given that any host animal would be quite removed from the thylacine, how would you address the issue of hormonal regulation during the pregnancy?
Mike: I don’t think this would cause any problem that couldn’t be, if necessary, artificially managed. In any case, you only have do this twice and they’ll be producing their own biochemical chemistry from that point on. Recent assessment suggests that Thylacines and Devils are sufficiently close enough to each other phylogenetically (same superfamily of marsupials, the Dasyuromorphia), with the thylacinid and dasyurid lineages separating perhaps no more than 35 million years ago, that a hybrid embryo involving a Devil egg and Thylacine DNA would almost certainly work.
To what degree does Prof. Archer hope to be involved with any future cloning attempt?
Mike: I’m first in line to pat the first one off the assembly line. Then I’m first in line for the first ones excess individuals beyond those used to restore Thylacines to the wild to have one as a pet.
Can he see the government funding a event search in Tasmania for a live specimen and what does he think about so many sightings that have been reported.
Mike: I’m not a great believer in the survival of Thylacines, although Col Bailey, who I do want to believe, has told me he saw one while he was having a pee in a remote corner of Tasmania. Apart from his claim, the others don’t stand up to examination. Show me the ‘money’, i.e. the hard evidence—hair, bones, flesh, poo. But nothing produced so far has convinced any biologist that they survived past the 1930s. There are lots of arguments for why it is almost impossible that they did survive, but that’s another issue.
Were thylacines superfoetal (birthed many joeys)and if so and fused onto the teat for a period of weeks like other m carnivores?
Mike: Probably they did produce more young at birth than they had nipples available. This is not uncommon in some of the carnivorous marsupials. But like any other carnivorous marsupials, the young would attach to a nipple and develop in the mother’s pouch for months before coming out to forage on their own. All of these behaviours would be hard-wired in the DNA of the Thylacine. These are not ‘taught’ behaviours.
Given other marsupial carnivores like devil and quoll don't moult and have the same double coat throughout their lives, is there any evidence that thylacine would have had a summer and winter coat?
Mike: I don’t know the answer to that. You might check Bob Paddle’s book ‘The Last Thylacine’, or ask Dr Stephen Sleightholme who you can contact via the web link ‘The International Thylacine Database’. Stephen knows everything!
Would you like to be in an episode of Hunt for The Tasmanian Tiger ?
Mike: Not a chance, unless it were to be a total skeptic or put the skeptic’s point of view. I’ve been involved in a lot of these things. You’ll find some of them in that document I sent with this email. The most recent one I haven’t noted is with a Japanese film company late last year. They did interview me extensively in UNSW. They also left cameras set up in the bush on the presumption that they would catch one in pictures. Needless to say, they haven’t had any success. The reason is that Thylacines are so smart they have found out how to use digital cameras and know how to erase images they don’t want anyone to see.
Professor Archer also had this information to add....
The Lazarus and Thylacine DeExtinction Projects
The TED talk I gave via the TEDx DeExtinction event held on 15 March 2013 can be accessed either via http://www.ted.com/…/michael_archer_how_we_ll_resurrect_the… or http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/7650.
A newspaper story by Nicky Phillips that appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on 15 March, 2013 (p. 1), is available online: http://www.smh.com.au/…/extinct-frog-hops-back-into-the-gen…. Another by Lisa Clauson that explores a range of issues related to the Lazarus Project appeared in various media on 22 June, 2013: http://www.smh.com.au/n…/waking-the-dead-20130617-2ocz4.html. Qantas Magazine also did a short feature article on the Lazarus Project: http://travelinsider.qantas.com.au/bright_ideas_scientist_m… . A documentary about the current state of the Lazarus Project prepared by Visionquest Pty Ltd which was released as a co-production with the Australian Broadcasting Commission on 7 March, 2017. Another short web document with some simple animation, intended for the general public, was produced by the University of New South Wales and can be accessed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dirLxqvXQG0. Guinness World Records 2016 includes the Lazarus Project for a new world record: ‘First living embryo grown from an extinct frog’.
There is an earlier Discovery Channel documentary about the Thylacine Project: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3gNW7LbO0M. More recently (2016), Fivethirtyeight has produced a short TV documentary about the idea or recovering ancient DNA from Thylacines to try to bring them back to life: http://fivethirtyeight.com/…/the-scientist-trying-to-rever…/.
For what it’s worth, you can hear a debate between me and the Executive Editor of Scientific American about the merits of deExtinction occurred on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (http://www.cbc.ca/toothandclaw/popupaudio.html…). Another web discussion about DeExtinction was released in 2017 by the BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04tv5vl. Its focus was (I think—haven’t listened to it yet!) on mammoths, passenger pigeons and the Bucardo among others.
In November, 2013, Time Magazine announced that the Lazarus Project was one of world’s 25 best ‘inventions’ for 2013 (http://phys.org/news/2013-11-lazarus-frog-resurrection.html) and one of the five featured online (http://techland.time.com/…/the-25-best-inventions-of-the-y…/). The Australian Science Media Centre has also listed the Lazarus Project as one the top 10 science stories for 2013 (http://www.smc.org.au/2013/12/top-ten-science-stories-2013/…).
Revive & Restore was the main organizer of the TEDxDeExtinction event in Washington, DC on March 15th. If you are looking at the field of deExtinction more generally, and where it is headed, then Revive's co-founders Stewart Brand or Ryan Phelan are important spokespeople for the overall concept of deExtinction. A 17 May, 2013, summary by David Biello of all of the talks given at this event can be seen at http://longnow.org/…/tedxdeextinction/tedxdeextinction-2013/.
Also, the National Geographic Society (NGS) devoted the cover story of their April 2013 edition to deExtinction, so you can find all kinds of content about this subject on their website by clicking here, http://www.nationalgeographic.com/deextinction. They have been involved to date with all of the meetings of scientists around the world focusing on deExtinction research projects.
A very readable and authoritative book published in 2016 reviews progress made on both the Thylacine and Lazarus Projects as well as a range of other current DeExtinction projects around the world: Bring back the king: the new science of de-extinction’ by Helen Pilcher (https://www.amazon.com/Bring-Back-King-Science…/…/147291225X).
We haven’t yet published on our Lazarus Project because we were keeping the research quiet until we discovered just how far we could get. The Revive & Restore organisation (part of the Long Now Foundation) and the National Geographic Society enticed many of us working on deExtinction projects around the world to come out from our ‘closets’ so to speak, to meet in October 2012 and mid March 2013, to talk with each other about our goals, aspirations and challenges. This has led to new multi-institutional collaborations that should accelerate progress on projects currently underway. It certainly has with our Lazarus Project via new links with Advanced Cell Technology in Boston. We are now preparing papers for publication about progress to date on the Lazarus Project and will continue to do so.
If you know anyone who can help support this research, we’d be delighted to hear from them. The Lazarus Project is only possible because of the Lazarus Fund that’s been established in UNSW in Sydney. Dick Smith and Gary Johnston (CEO of Jaycar) have been extremely helpful in providing core private funding that’s enabled the Lazarus Project to achieve what we’ve managed so far. This support does not in any way undermine support for any conventional conservation project because it is ‘new money’. Of course there’s still more to be done so further donations are going to be important if we’re to have any hope of achieving the ultimate goal—the Gastric-brooding Frog hopping glad to be back in the world again.
It’s probable that if we’re successful in bringing back Gastric-brooding Frogs, it may be necessary to splice in a gene for resistance to this fungus prior to release of populations back into the wild. The gene demonstrating resistance in frog populations around the world is currently the subject of research (e.g., http://www.pnas.org/content/108/40/16705.short).
In the meantime it’s great to know that bright folk all around the world are as excited as we are about the possibilities of bringing extinct species back into the world, particularly those that are gone because of something we humans did—or should have done but didn’t. If we broke it, I strongly believe that we should try to fix it, if we can. DeExtinction represents a new, potentially very important conservation tool to optimise biodiversity in the world for all the reasons we know this is important. It’s not an alternative or a threat to more conventional conservation programs, and it could be very important in terms of developing techniques to secure currently endangered species by cross-species cloning (e.g., by using common species to build up the numbers of their endangered relatives) as well as by bringing back potentially keystone species whose absence threatens the stability of the ecosystems of which they were once a part. Removal of wolves from Yellowstone National Park, for example, resulted in severe downstream environmental damage which was only reversed when wolves were returned.
We need every kind of effective arrow in the conservationist’s quiver we can get to stop the current accelerating slippage into the world’s 6th mass extinction event. DeExtinction research has the potential to produce one of the most important compatible arrows of this kind.
Cheers,
Mike
Prof. Michael Archer, PANGEA Research Center
School of Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
University of New South Wales, Sydney AUSTRALIA 2052
http://www.pangea.unsw.edu.au/…/academic-res…/michael-archer; http://www.create.unsw.edu.au/team/marcher/; m.archer@unsw.edu.au

New thylacine Facebook group is taking off..






A great new tasmanian tiger page is now up and running created by Wade Francis...it has the latest interview this group did with with Dr Sleightholme and Cameron Campbell on their thylacine research and data base as well as a question and answer with Professor Mike Archer on the future of thylacine cloning 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ThylacineDebate/

Dr Sleightholme and Cameron Campbell on thylacines

We have joined a great Thylacine group on facebook run by Wade Francis
The Thylacine Open Debate and Discussion Page
Dr Sleightholme and Cameron Campbell have responded to members questions..


We have our responses from Dr Sleightholme and Cameron Campbell.
Here is what we were sent.......
Both Cameron Campbell and I thank you for the invitation to participate in the Q&A session for your Facebook group. First, a little about our backgrounds:
Dr Stephen Sleightholme is author of several scientific papers on the thylacine and Project Director to the International Thylacine Specimen Database. Now into its 6th revision, the ITSD is the culmination of a major cooperative effort between museums and universities that hold specimens of the thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), to produce the first comprehensive study of all that is known to physically remain of this unique species. In 2005, the ITSD was presented with a prestigious Whitley Award, the first time in the history of the awards that a citation had been presented for a database.
Cameron Campbell is Curator of the online Thylacine Museum and author of several scientific papers on the thylacine. The Thylacine Museum is a world class educational resource and the most comprehensive source of information on the thylacine available anywhere on the web, or for that matter, in any conventional museum display. Now into its 18th year, the museum was an early pioneer in internet education, being one of the first natural history websites. The latest revision brings together expert opinion from many disciplines, and this, combined with its many interactive features, ensures that the site appeals to both the amateur naturalist and academic alike.
1/Warren Darragh- Does the study of wet specimens and the fossil record support Bergman rule?
Stephen responds:
As far as I am aware, no research has been undertaken to support or reject Bergman’s rule with respect to the thylacine. Few thylacine specimens (wet or dry) note the place of capture, most only recording that they originated from Tasmania. Because of this omission in provenance, we are unable to state that thylacines caught in the colder highlands were larger than those caught in the warmer lowlands.
2/Branden Holmes- Is he going to publish the paper he was working on with Heinz Moeller about thylacine dentition before Moeller passed away?
Stephen responds:
At present, no further work has been undertaken on this paper, as other projects have taken precedence. That said, it is an area that Cameron and I may return to at some future date.
3/Warren Darragh- How evident is sexual dimorphism in thylacine?
Stephen responds:
Sexual dimorphism is evident in the thylacine, with adult males being around 14% larger than adult females. It should be noted that this figure is based on a limited study of 28 animals [18 male and 10 female]. In this sample, the mean male total body length from the nose to the tip of the tail was found to be 1.61m, and the mean female total body length 1.38m.
4/Nicole Dyble- Wonder if males would also have larger head and generally larger in size like other marsupial carnivores....but can be difficult to determine gender in juveniles.
Cameron responds:
With respect to the thylacine’s head, there is a marked difference in the skull size between the sexes, the male thylacine having a proportionately larger skull with a longer face. The skull of the female is distinguishable from that of the male by its smaller size, shorter muzzle, less expanded zygomata, and with respect to its dentition, smaller but proportionally larger teeth.
5/Branden Holmes- Any papers currently in the process of being written/accepted/published?
Stephen responds.
Cameron and I have three papers in production. A paper entitled “The International Thylacine Specimen Database (6th Revision - Project Summary & Final Report)” is currently in review for publication in the Australian Zoologist later this year. A second paper entitled “Stripe pattern variation in the coat of the Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus)” is submission ready, and a third paper describing two previously unknown photographs of thylacines at the London Zoo is currently being written.
6/Warren Darragh- In various commercial productions on the thylacine there have been differing views on the animals maximum jaw gape. What would be your estimate be?
Cameron responds:
The gape angle is often quoted as being in the order of 120 degrees. This however, is a gross exaggeration, as opening the jaw more than 80 degrees would violate the integrity of the joint.
7/Louise Sherratt=Does he think they are still alive?
Cameron responds:
Stephen and I recently published a paper in the Australian Zoologist entitled “A retrospective assessment of 20th century thylacine populations”, in which we presented the first comprehensive study of the thylacine’s post-1900 range, based on the retrospective analysis of 1167 geo-referenced capture, kill, and confirmed sighting reports, from 1900 to 1940. In the paper, we examined the probable causes of population collapse, and discussed the possibility that the species survived into the 1940s and beyond. We concluded that the thylacine certainly survived beyond Benjamin’s (the last known captive thylacine) demise in 1936, and that the species was extant in the 1940s and probably beyond. As to its present-day survival, my answer would be possibly, as one cannot easily dismiss the Naarding sighting in 1982, or Col Bailey’s sighting in 1995, as misidentifications. Understandably, the scientific community demands a body or proof photograph / video to confirm the continued existence of the species, and to date, that has not been forthcoming.
8/Christine Mats- And if yes, does he think it's more likely to be on the mainland or Tasmania-New guinea?
Cameron responds:
I would think it far more likely that the thylacine survives in Tasmania than on the mainland. That said, one cannot discount all mainland sightings. The 1973 Doyle footage from South Australia and the 1984 Kevin Cameron photographs from Western Australia are rather interesting, and take some explaining if we dismiss them as being a thylacine. Much of New Guinea’s rugged interior remains unexplored to this day, and it is anybody’s guess as to whether the thylacine still survives on the island. Certainly, the thylacine was present there during the Pleistocene, as indicated by the discovery of fossil remains. Prior to about 1930, there were an estimated 1 million people living in New Guinea that were unknown to the outside world, so it is interesting to speculate on what as yet undiscovered species (including mammals) might possibly exist in the dense forests of the island’s mountainous, difficult to traverse interior.
9/Warren Darragh- How might a citizen scientist get access to the international thylacine database?
Stephen responds:
The sixth revision of the International Thylacine Specimen Database will be released online towards the end of 2017, and will be accessible through an academic portal on the Thylacine Museum website.
10/Steve Crawford-As a carnivorous marsupial, how was its locomotion in respect to its prey. Did they primarily use stamina or ambush as its main hunting strategy?
Cameron responds:
The thylacine is a pursuit predator and employs various hunting strategies dependent upon the nature of the prey being hunted, and whether it is hunting alone, or as a member of a larger family unit. This is discussed in detail on the Thylacine Museum website, at the links given below:
http://www.naturalworlds.org/…/bi…/behaviour/behaviour_5.htm
http://www.naturalworlds.org/…/bi…/behaviour/behaviour_6.htm
http://www.naturalworlds.org/…/bi…/behaviour/behaviour_7.htm
11/Mike Williams- How different was the locomotion of thylacines compared to canids..?
Cameron responds:
The thylacine is digitigrade, and like dogs and cats, walks on its toes. A major difference between the feet of the thylacine and those of a canid is that there is no webbing present between the thylacine’s toes. Thylacines also have proportionately longer rear limbs as compared to canids, giving them a rear-to-front sloping back, and a loping gait. Please see the following Thylacine Museum pages for further details:
http://www.naturalworlds.org/…/b…/behaviour/behaviour_10.htm
http://www.naturalworlds.org/…/b…/behaviour/behaviour_11.htm
12-Warren Darragh- As a follow up on the gait question- how does convergent evolution, combined with the need for predators to be efficient in their movement help explain (or not) post extinction sighting reports claiming thylacine have an awkward gait- when members of the canine do not?
Cameron responds:
I would prefer not to use the term “post extinction” in the context of sightings, as we do not yet know with certainty if the extinction event has occurred. The thylacine was / is perfectly adapted to the environment in which it hunted. It is a stealth predator, and as such, is not designed for long bursts of speed. Numerous historical reports mention that the thylacine has an unusual gait, often described as loping. Anatomically, this would not necessarily be inefficient in comparison to the gait of a canid.

Interview with Col Bailey

Just spotted this interview with Col Bailey about his latest book.
No one alive has spent as much time and effort as Col has to promote the existence of the animals and the stories of the bushmen dealing with the tigers

Video is here

Facebook Hoaxing



Tis the season for Facebook pranks.
Make sure you pretend you just stumbled  on to the animal.Tick
Make sure the animal doesnt react like a normal animal.Tick
Pretend you don`t know what the animal is, your just "putting it out there" .Tick
Pretend you dont have any idea what the true value of the photos would be, if they were real..just give them away on facebook.Tick

 And Geoff Treloar, ergo..The Prankster has pulled the post.
Link

The Lure Of The Thylacine







Lure of the Thylacine HERE
Easily Col Baileys best book so far. !
The passion and dedication that Col has put into this subject astounds me.
As engrossing as the stories are, what is perhaps the saddest thing is..they show you how ignorant people were,sometimes, in those days when they encountered these poor animals.
There are 64 punchy short chapters on tiger encounters and stories, some that do end happily, at least for the tiger.!!
Professor Mike Archer has been so impressed with Col`s work that he happily accepted the request to write a really good introduction.
Col`s first book all started when Col interviewed Reg trigg back in 1980...
And now this..which is by far his best..and will not be his last..
Get this book..
The tiger is still out there..the Lure of the thylacine will never go away..!!

Tasmanian tiger drawings

David Hurst and I visited Richard Onn, a very talented artist, a few months ago.
We just had the tiger with cubs charcoal drawing framed at home.
Tiger fans should talk to him..!!
https://www.facebook.com/Richard-Onn-467580253295666/


Tasmanian Tiger

Tasmanian Tiger shot Photo

For once, a real thylacine shot story...a historical one..I have been to the gates of the farm where this tragedy happened.
And I know members of the Batty family..
To all the mainland hunters of tasmanian tigers..keep on ignoring the most recent body of a tiger on the mainland was only dated at more than 3k + years..whilst in Tasmania... its 80 years...
But that means nothing right..? :)
The main unemployed  proponent of "their are no tigers in tasmania"... traveled to Tasmania 15 years ago,  stayed for about a week..then went home and filmed a fox in Victoria..and called that a tiger.
Yup..cutting edge research...!
It also has made claims in the media that tigers were wiped out in Tasmania because they were attacking sheep..
FFS...read one flipping book on the subject instead of  beclowning yourself all the time.
Tigers were never a threat to sheep in Tasmania,...poor  farmers had made that claim..but it had no basis in reality...are you following that simple statement. ?
What is it about some Victorian "tiger hunters" and their inability to know what a fox looks like..or even read one book...?


  A FASCINATION with the Tasmanian tiger has led a Hobart man to pay top dollar for a photograph of the last known thylacine in the wild.
The original photograph, purchased by Nevin Hurst, sold at Gowan's auctions for $9775 last Saturday.
According to an article in The Advocate dated Wednesday, May 14, 1930, the photograph depicts a man named Wilfred Batty, who shot and killed the animal after seeing it kill poultry on his farm at Mawbanna, on the North-West Coast.
HISTORICAL: The last known image of a thylacine in the wild.
The tale said the animal was "exceptionally large", measuring five feet and six inches in length.

It said the thylacine "caused a great deal of trouble in the Mawbanna district, having wrought havoc in fowl pens, while it had also frightened several children."
Mr Hurst said the reserve price for the photograph was set at $20 but later raised to $250.
He said he was not sure how many people he was bidding against because it was done over the phone.
"We don't know who put the photograph into auction, except that it was a lady."
Mr Hurst said the photograph, which measures 5cm by 10cm, was in excellent condition.
"We need to preserve what little we have, which is why the photograph is just so important."
He said his son shares the same fascination with the creature.
"I have been buying Tasmanian tiger skins and putting them into a collection. One reason we collect is we hope to match the stripes on his back in the photograph with one of our skins.
"The photograph and skins will all go into a private collection and won't be released until we are absolutely satisfied with it."
He said he still holds hope that the thylacine exists.
"If there's any tigers out there - no one is saying there isn't - the gene pool is so small they would be inbred and without strength. They would be destined to become extinct anyway." source